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March 22, 2017

The world has lost a truly great entomologist, perhaps its greatest collector of beetles, with the death of David A. Rockefeller

arockbeet.png

on Monday at the age of one hundred and one, among the cabinets of his specimens at Pocantico Hills: each impeccably labelled and mounted.
Rockefeller’s dwarfed the collections of Darwin and Wallace, the accumulated stores in Oxford University, the holdings of natural history museums in many sizeable European countries. At the age of seven, this young David discovered his calling — or was called, by an elegant, an elongate Parandra, glittering dark caramel, the full inch long, with its formidable pinching mandibles. It was trespassing in the foliage on his father’s estate. Veritably, a Parandra brunneus. Bravely lifting it by its sides, the lad dropped it into a bottle, the first of his hundred thousand catches, by one means or another. The rest is silence : Essays in Idleness

Posted by gerardvanderleun at March 22, 2017 7:14 PM. This is an entry on the sideblog of American Digest: Check it out.

Your Say

An essay in idleness? Yes indeed, David Rockefeller had his hobbies which many would approve and delight upon. But he was VERY frisky when it came to shaping this world to the whims of his own greed. The man was a grand puke of the highest order. Gary North has some choice opinions and other links for you to consider.
http://www.garynorth.com/public/16378.cfm

Posted by: Tom Hyland at March 23, 2017 8:15 AM

Is that a Dung Beetle?

Posted by: ghostsniper at March 23, 2017 8:26 AM

The Creator would appear as endowed with a passion for stars, on the one hand, and for beetles on the other, for the simple reason that there are nearly 300,000 species of beetle known, and perhaps more, as compared with somewhat less than 9,000 species of birds and a little over 10,000 species of mammals. Beetles are actually more numerous than the species of any other insect order. That kind of thing is characteristic of nature.
-- J.B.S. Haldane, biology dude

Posted by: SteveS at March 23, 2017 10:12 AM

How entomologists pass away:
http://tinyurl.com/lm28hlk

Sorry.

Posted by: G6loq at March 24, 2017 7:09 AM

Perhaps a funeral attended by dermestid beetles would be fitting:

http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/kits.html

Posted by: itor at March 24, 2017 7:14 PM

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