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December 10, 2013

Cigarette cards life hacks

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How to fell a tree "Have decided which side you wish the tree to fall, cut alternatively a downward and inward cut as shown. When about half through, proceed to cut the other side a few inches higher, and finally pull tree down by means of ropes." | Retronaut

Posted by gerardvanderleun at December 10, 2013 12:27 PM. This is an entry on the sideblog of American Digest: Check it out.

Your Say

"And as you are pulling the tree down, get the hell out of the way."

Posted by: Darkwater at December 10, 2013 12:31 PM

Not sure I agree with that approach.

Yes, you start by 'facing' the tree. Making the notch cut on the side towards where you wish the tree to fall. But it is important to note that this cut is merely a suggestion. If the tree is strongly leaning, or weighted by limbs in another direction all the facing in the world will not change where the tree is going to fall.

Plan accordingly.

The second cut is then made on the opposite side of the tree, but I was taught to make this horizontal cut below the horizontal line of the face cut. If it still doesn't fall then you start driving wedges into this back cut until it does.

When it does start to fall you get the Hell out of the way. Falling trees to crazy things - especially with other trees around or on uneven terrain. A glancing blow from a trunk will break bones, anything more serious contact will cost you a limb, or your life.

But I was taught this approach when using a chain saw. The reason the second cut is below the first is so that, if the bar is still in trunk when it starts to fall, the falling tree will not take the saw along with it.

Standing in front of a tree after front and back cuts is suicidal.

Posted by: ThomasD at December 10, 2013 1:02 PM

I have gotten good results by cutting the facing notch a little deeper than half way through the trunk then just sawing a single cut on the opposite side. If the saw goes in freely, you can be pretty sure the tree will fall as intended and it can even be steered in its fall by adjusting the angle of the cut as the tree starts leaning. If the saw starts binding, then that is a pretty good clue that the tree is likely to fall in an unintended direction.

Posted by: Chazz at December 10, 2013 2:26 PM

ThomasD "....cut is merely a suggestion." Excellent phrase, having cut many trees in my day, the best laid plans still leave many downed trees not exactly where you intended.

Posted by: tripletap at December 10, 2013 3:14 PM

Actually, they taught us how to do this in Boy Scouts. I even found use for it later in life.

Posted by: Donald Sensing at December 10, 2013 6:35 PM

Hire a Mex to do the cutting. If the tree falls on them, that's a double Eco cleanup.

Posted by: Vermont Woodchuck at December 11, 2013 1:55 AM

Buddy of mine had his new house built in the woods in a new development. First new house, first time living in the great outdoors without the neighbors windows staring at yours.
The day before he moved in, his father-in-law dropped by to do some finish work. He looked at a tree that had been left that was behind the house (the wife had wanted the shade) and decided that he would cut it down, "because it might come down in a storm".
When my buddy got down there after work, the father-in-law was standing in the back yard with a smoking chain saw and the tree was on the house. One large branch punched through the roof and was sticking inside the daughters bedroom.
He called me up and asked me (after he had informed me of developments) to give him some good reasons NOT to kill his father-in-law. I suggested," Let Paula do it".

Posted by: John at December 11, 2013 10:54 AM

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