≡ Menu

Something Wonderful: Much Farming. Many Food. — “A Year On Our Farm In 5 Minutes”

Farming is still a grown up little boy activity. You get to bomb around in big machines.

Unlike the highway, you make more money if you go faster, instead of getting a speeding ticket. There’s nothing to crash into.

People respect farmers. Many paper pushers long for the kind of job, like farming, where you can see the results of your efforts at the end of the day. For instance, early in the morning, the field is tan. End of the day, it’s slightly darker tan. That’s visible progress. Middle of the season, it’s greenish. End of the season, your bank account’s greenish, and the field’s tan again. Like a good video game, you get to press the reset button and start all over again. If the good lord’s willing and the creek don’t rise.

RTWT at: Much Farming. Many Food – BSBFB

Alert the Authorities!

{ 6 comments… add one }
  • Dr. Jay August 6, 2017, 12:36 PM

    Great post! I grew up on a farm. Pretty cool, yes indeed. Although my father, as a Calvinist, never paid a lot of attention to what the creek was doing, or what it was gonna do.

  • Larry Geiger August 7, 2017, 5:30 AM

    Some bad tractors!!

  • Casey Klahn August 7, 2017, 9:31 AM

    Sippican does it again!

    Interesting to see advanced farming in the UK. I don’t know why – I guess I’m ethnocentrist and first think of here in the US for ag that is ultra advanced technologically.

    I noticed their not spreading feces in leu of chemicals. Bully!

  • Casey Klahn August 7, 2017, 9:33 AM

    Oh, I forgot to mention it’s harvest time here in Eastern WA, and it is one of the wonders of our age. Farmers love technology, and are whip smart when it comes to things that matter. It puts a lump in your throat, really.

  • Casey Klahn August 7, 2017, 9:34 AM

    “they’re” – dang!

  • SgtBob August 7, 2017, 12:49 PM

    My grandparents and great-grandparents and back many a generation used mules and a one-row breaking plow, sowed by hand, picked/harvested by hand. A couple hundred acres was a big job.

Leave a Comment