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January 7, 2013

The Professional Poor, the Idle Poor and the Poverty Traders

reparations1.jpg
I still care for the truly beaten down, but I have no compassion for the Professional Poor.
I never give money anyone who comes to my church asking for money or in-kind donations. And by never I mean, "never." (What part of "never" don't you understand?) There are countless businesses I do not choose to buy from, and when the Professional Poor come to sell their edge-of-disaster poverty to me, my wallet stays put.... At least, though, the Professional Poor are working for a living. I'll credit them that even if their living in the scam, the con, fraud and deceit. -- Donald Sensing @ Sense of Events

Posted by gerardvanderleun at January 7, 2013 10:20 AM. This is an entry on the sideblog of American Digest: Check it out.

Your Say

I dunno - she looks jewish to me...

Posted by: M00se at January 7, 2013 5:38 PM

Tell her to mark my portion "Paid in Full" by my greatgrandfathers who served as privates in the Union Army.

Posted by: glenn at January 7, 2013 5:57 PM

She owes MY family HER ancestor's fare for passage on the underground railway.

Posted by: old surfer at January 7, 2013 7:12 PM

Actually, slaves were property -- purchased property -- and as despicable as that was, reparations were proposed to be paid TO slaveowners as compensation for their financial loss, and thereby, it was hoped, diminishing the outrage against emancipation seen as theft of property and reducing the threat of war.



Posted by: Saintperle at January 8, 2013 3:10 PM

Actually, looking at my previous comment, I realize this is like approving of Adolph Eichmann's proposal to sell/trade Jews for tractors. This was later considered an outrageous thing to do, to view them as inventory, but considering the alternative (Auschwitz, Dachau, et al) I always thought, even as a kid when I first heard of it, that it was a sort of humanistic thing for him to do -- a weird, distorted perverted thing to do, but given his social context (weird, distorted, perverted), had I been one of those who were boxcar-bound, I would have applauded the "out-of-the-boxcar" thinking. No one liked to think that Eichmann ever had ANY human feelings, nor do people today don't like to think Lincoln was that much of an unemotional pragmatist.

Posted by: Saintperle at January 8, 2013 3:21 PM

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