June 5, 2011

On Courage: "I don't want your son to end up laying on some city street with his legs blown off by a Marxist-Islamist-Obamaist RPG bleeding to death because he had to shoulder my personal failure in courage."

D-DAY, JUNE 6

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"Good will always prevail, but there is no limit to the amount of suffering that will be required for that victory to occur. If men stand up early on, the suffering will be minimized because it will be spread over many people. The worst that might happen is that some folks go to bed scared for a while, but widespread bravery will allow good to prevail without much suffering. If, however, there is a decided lack of courage displayed by a large group or society early on in an advance by the powers of evil, that aggregated courage requirement will be borne by a relative few at a later time. The longer this goes on, the worse it will be for the few who have to bear the weight of the cowardice of the broad society." -- Ann Barnhardt

"Full victory - nothing else." On D-Day, 67 years ago, this was what was done...

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Photo, Gen Dwight D Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. "Full victory - nothing else" to paratroopers in England, 6 June 1944.

Gen Dwight D Eisenhower gives the order of the Day. "Full victory - nothing else" to paratroopers in England, just before they board their airplanes to participate in the first assault in the invasion of the continent of Europe. Note the faces of the men listening:

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On the way to the assault boats

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Photo, Trucks are being loaded onto an LCT in a British port.
Anti-aircraft halftracks to support initial wave of the assault against Hitler’s Europe begins are being loaded onto an LCT in a British port.

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Paratroopers get final instructions before leaving for Normandy.

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Assault landing. One of the first waves at Omaha. The Coast Guard caption identifies the unit as Company E, 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.

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Omaha Beach

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Utah Beach

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FIRST WAVE AT OMAHA: THE ORDEAL OF THE BLUE AND GRAY
Omaha Beach, D-Day, June 6, 1944

Behind them was a great invasion armada and the powerful sinews of war. But in the first wave of assault troops of the 29th (Blue and Gray) Infantry Division, it was four rifle companies landing on a hostile shore at H-hour, D-Day - 6:30 a.m., on June 6, 1944.

The long-awaited liberation of France was underway. After long months in England, National Guardsmen from Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia found themselves in the vanguard of the Allied attack.

In those early hours on the fire-swept beach the 116th Infantry Combat Team, the old Stonewall Brigade of Virginia, clawed its way through Les Moulins draw toward its objective, Vierville-sur-Mer.

It was during the movement from Les Moulins that the battered but gallant 2d Battalion broke loose from the beach, clambered over the embankment, and a small party, led by the battalion commander, fought its way to a farmhouse which became its first Command Post in France. The 116th suffered monre than 800 casualties this day - a day which will long be remembered as the beginning of the Allies' "Great Crusade" to rekindle the lamp of liberty and freedom on the continent of Europe.

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Wrecked German Pillbox

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Normandy Sabbath

Posted by Vanderleun at June 5, 2011 8:15 PM
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"It is impossible to speak in such a way that you cannot be misunderstood." -- Karl Popper N.B.: Comments are moderated and may not appear immediately. Comments that exceed the obscenity or stupidity limits will be either edited or expunged.

Damn, she is good. I like her more every time I hear or read her.

Posted by: rickl at June 5, 2011 10:32 PM