March 3, 2015

Boomer Anthems: "Fortunate Son"

Some folks are born, made to wave the flag
Ooo, their red, white and blue
And when the band plays "Hail to the Chief"
Ooo, they point the cannon at you, Lord

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no senator's son, son
It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, no

Some folks are born, silver spoon in hand
Lord, don't they help themselves, y'all
But when the taxman comes to the door
Lord, the house looks like a rummage sale, yeah

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no millionaire's son, no, no
It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, no

Yeah, yeah
Some folks inherit star spangled eyes
Ooh, they send you down to war, Lord
And when you ask 'em, "How much should we give?"
Ooh, they only answer "More! More! More!", y'all

It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no military son, son
It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, one
It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, no, no, no
It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate son, no, no, no

snopes.com: Is Creedence Clearwater Revival's 'Fortunate Son' About Al Gore? A compilation of other comments by Fogerty on "Fortunate Son" is included in Craig Werner's oral history of Creedence Clearwater Revival, Up Around the Bend:

When I wrote "Fortunate Son," Julie Nixon was hanging around with David Eisenhower. And you just had the feeling that none of those people were going to be involved with the war. In 1969, the majority of the country thought morale was great among the troops, and like eighty percent of them were in favor of the war. But to some of us who were watching closely, we just knew we were headed for trouble ... It was written, of course, during the Nixon era, and, well, let's say I was very nonsupportive of Mr. Nixon There just seemed to be this trickle down to the offspring of people like him. You got the impression that these people got preferential treatment, and the whole idea of being born wealthy or being born powerful seemed to really be coming to the fore in the late-sixties' confrontation of cultures. I was twenty-three years old, I think. I was mad at the specter of the ordinary kid who had to serve in an army in a war that he was very much against. Yet the sons of the well-to-do and powerful didn't have to worry about those things. They were fortunate. I thought, all these guys were running around saying, "It's good for America" — Nixon or whoever was saying this. Yet their kids ain't going.

Posted by gerardvanderleun at March 3, 2015 1:18 AM
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"It is impossible to speak in such a way that you cannot be misunderstood." -- Karl Popper N.B.: Comments are moderated and may not appear immediately. Comments that exceed the obscenity or stupidity limits will be either edited or expunged.

"When I wrote "Fortunate Son" ... I was twenty-three years old, I think."
That says it all.

I bet his kids are spoon-fed and feather-pillowed. They are fortunate.

Posted by: chasmatic at March 3, 2015 6:04 AM

Nixon...There just seemed to be this trickle down to the offspring of people like him.

People like him, John? You mean poor kids who made their own way through law school without any help? Are those the "people like him" you're referring to?

Swallowed that old Marxist canard hook, line and sinker, didn't you?

Posted by: Rob De Witt at March 3, 2015 8:12 AM

Fogerty was 23 when he wrote Fortunate Son...I was 23 and humping in the bush in a unit of the 101st. There could be nothing else that would so differentiate us. The boomer critical thinking skills of Fogerty and his fellow travelers would be confused as to why every institution in this country is face down in the moral gutter. All thanks to the influence of his fellow progressive boomers on the culture they helped create.

Posted by: indyjonesouthere at March 3, 2015 11:11 AM

I think Fogerty was the Fortunate One. He spent time hanging out in the Coast Guard.

Posted by: Scott M at March 3, 2015 6:25 PM